Getting Started: Itron Riva Dev Edge Kit

PDF - Getting Started: Itron Riva Dev Edge Kit



Welcome to the Itron Riva Dev Edge Kit Getting Started Guide! The purpose of this Guide is to give you a fast path to both understanding and using the Itron Riva Dev Edge Kit.

The Itron Riva Dev Edge Kit includes everything you need to begin your prototyping or development for an Itron OpenWay Riva Network,including:
  • Two Itron Riva Dev Edge boards
  • Two Itron Riva Dev Edge RF boards
  • Two 900Mhz 802.15.4g antennas
  • Two serial-to-USB cables (used for Linux console connection
  • Two 5VDC power cables


Host Computer

You should have a host computer, such as an Ubuntu, Mac, or Window. The instructions shown here are using a Ubuntu system as the host, but similar steps can be performed on Mac or Windows.

For reference, the version of Ubuntu used for these instructions is 16.04:

$ cat /etc/os-release
NAME="Ubuntu"
VERSION="16.04.2 LTS (Xenial Xerus)"
ID=ubuntu
ID_LIKE=debian
PRETTY_NAME="Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS"
VERSION_ID="16.04"
HOME_URL="http://www.ubuntu.com/"
SUPPORT_URL="http://help.ubuntu.com/"
BUG_REPORT_URL="http://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/"
VERSION_CODENAME=xenial
UBUNTU_CODENAME=xenial


Your host computer will need a terminal emulator to connect to the Itron Riva Dev console. Here we use minicom:

$ minicom --version
minicom version 2.7 (compiled Feb 7 2016)
Copyright (C) Miquel van Smoorenburg.


Connect and Power-up ROOT

Follow these steps to connect and power-up your Itron Riva Dev Edge Kit. Some of these steps in these section apply to both ROOT and NODE, and are hence labeled [BOTH]. Other steps are only for the ROOT, and are hence labeled [ROOT]. Some of the steps are labeled [HOST], which means you perform those steps on your host computer.

Important: The network performs best when you power up the ROOT device before powering up the NODEs. Hence, in this section you will connect both ROOT and NODE, but only power-up the ROOT.
  1. Connect the antennas to each of the boards
  2. Connect the 5VDC power cords to each of the boards.  DO NOT YET Power Up the boards.
  3. Connect the serial-to-USB cable to the 4-pin console connector on each of the boards, being careful to get the color codes connected correctly.  This is the white connector on the bottom of the boards.  DO NOT YET Plug the cable into your host computer.

Pin 1 Yellow (TX)
Pin 2

Orange (RX)

Pin 3 Not Used
Pin 4 Black (GND)

NOTE: A memory technique is to remember that the Black (GND) cable connects closest to the 5VDC power connector as shown here.



4. [ROOT] On the board labeled ROOT, plug the Ethernet cable into the Itron Riva Dev Edge Ethernet connector. The ROOT device requires a connection via Ethernet to obtain the proper time from an Network Time Protocol (NTP) server.




5. [HOST]  On your host computer, use the ls command to observe if any /dev/ttyUSBn ports are in us. In this example, no ports are currently in use:

$ ls /dev/ttyU*
ls: cannot access ‘/dev/ttyU*’: No such file or directory


6. [ROOT] Plug the ROOT serial-to-USB connector into your host USB port. Then issue the ls command and you should now see a /dev/ttyUSB0 port.

$ ls /dev/ttyU*
/dev/ttyUSB0


7. [HOST] Start up minicom:

$ sudo minicom -D /dev/ttyUSB0

8. [HOST]  In minicom, press Ctrl+a+z, then o, select “Serial Port Setup”. Make sure you turn of hardware flow control.

NOTE:
A common error is to forget to turn off hardware flow control. The result is you will see OUTPUT but will not be able to type any input.




9. [ROOT] Power up the ROOT device. You should see output on your minicom screen similar to the following. Do not press any key, but rather watch the system boot.
NOTE: Although you do not want to do it now, later if you need to interrupt the default boot process, you have 3 seconds to press any key to stop the auto boot process.

10. [ROOT] At the end of the boot process you will see the message “system sanity achieved”.
NOTE: The screen shot below is for a ROOT device. The RCV messages are from the on-board DHCP server (which is only on the ROOT). You can also see the utc time, showing that the ROOT is connected to the Internet, and accessing a NTP server.



11. [ROOT] Press ENTER to see the itron-isom login prompt, then enter root. When prompted for the password, enter itron. You will then see the shell prompt of #.




12. [ROOT] Use the modversion.sh command to confirm the version of firmware running on your ROOT device. For this example, the MUSE version is 3.1.264. The DSP version is 3.5.67.




13. [ROOT] Use the df command to confirm how must disk filesystem space you have available. In this example, only 20% of the root filesystem is in use.



14. [ROOT] Use the free command to see how much free RAM space you have available. In this example, the system has a total of 112MB of memory in use, and 4MB of RAM free.



15. [ROOT] Use ngcstatus.sh command to see the sync status of the ROOT. The key item you are looking for is SYCnEt from RPL-Daemon. Status.



16. [ROOT] Use the dodag_dump.sh command to see if you have any NODES. Since you have not yet powered up the NODE, you should not have any NODES listed.



At this point you have powered up your ROOT device and used several commands to confirm its proper operation. It is now time to power-up your NODE device, following these steps.

Connect and Power-up NODE



1.  [NODE] Plug the NODE serial-to-USB connector into another USB port on your host computer. (Keep your ROOT serial-to-USB plugged in to your host so that you can view both ROOT and HOST messages in separate windows.)

2.  [HOST] Use the ls command and you should now see a 2nd USB port:

$ ls /dev/ttyU*
/dev/ttyUSB0
/dev/ttyUSB1


3. [HOST] Start up minicom:

$ sudo minicom -D /dev/ttyUSB1




4. [HOST] In minicom, press Ctrl+a+z, then o, select “Serial Port Setup”. Make sure you turn off hardware flow control.

NOTE:
A common error is to forget to turn of hardware flow control. The result is you will see OUTPUT but will not be able to type any input.

5. [NODE] Power up the NODE device. You should see output on your minicom screen similar to the following. Do not press any key, but rather watch the system boot.

NOTE: Although you do not want to to it now, later if you need to interrupt the default boot process, you have 3 seconds to press any key to stop the auto boot process.



6. [NODE] At the end of the boot process you see the message “system sanity achieved”.

NOTE: The screen shot below is for a NODE device. The screen shot for a ROOT device is different.




7. [NODE] Press ENTER to see the itron-isom login prompt, then enter root. When prompted for the password, enter itron. You will then see the shell prompt of #.




8. [NODE] Use the modversion.sh command to confirm the version of firmware running on your ROOT device. For this example, the MUSE version is 3.1.264. The DSP version is 3.5.67.




9. [NODE] Use the df command to confirm how must disk filesystem space you have available. In this example, 18% of the root filesystem is in use.



10. [NODE] Use the free command to see how much free RAM space you have available. In this example, the system has a total of 109MB of memory in use, and almost 8MB of RAM free.



11.[NODE] Use ngcstatus.sh command to see the sync status of the ROOT. The key item you are looking for is SYCnEt from RPL-Daemon. Status.

NOTE: Notice Node IPv6 address: fd16:e8ac:e37c:2010:f9c9



Using ping6



1. [NODE]Use the ifconfig nan0 command to view the NODEs IPv6 address. For this example, the NODE IPV6 address is: fd16:e8ac:e37c:2010::f9c9




2. [NODE] Use the ping6 command to confirm that the node can ping6 the ROOT.

NOTE: For these examples, the ROOT will always have a base address of febe. Just take the node address (e.g. fd16:e8ac:e37c:2010::f9c9) and substitute the value of febe (e.g. fd16:e8ac:e37c:2010::febe).




3. [ROOT] With the NODE up and running, you can return to the ROOT console. Issue the neighbor-dump.sh -m command to see that the NODE is in the list.

Note: Observe address f9c9 has a HWType (Hardware Type) of MPD (Mains Powered Device), has a best RF modulation of OFDM_600, and has an RF RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator) of -16.


4. [ROOT] Use the ping6 command on the ROOT to ping6 the NODE.




Summary and Next Steps



In summary, this Guide has shown you how to connect, power-up, and confirm the operation of an Itron Riva Dev Edge Kit. You have used both the ROOT device and the NODE device on a RF mesh network. You next step is to refer to the appropriate documentation that fits you are particular need.